Learning Techniques of the Auditory Learner

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by Patrice on May 17, 2011 · 1 comment

in Techniques

Some kids are good at writing reports based on what they’ve read, but have a hard time recounting the information from a lecture. These kids are visual learners. The students who can give an accurate account what they’ve heard are auditory learners.  Neither of these learning techniques is right or wrong, but it’s important that the learning style of the student is recognized so that they are given the greatest opportunity to reap the value of the lesson.

How do you know if your child is an auditory learner? There are some education techniques that children use subconsciously that can give the single mom clues.

Does your child sit quietly and read, or do the read aloud, even to themselves?

♦ Auditory learners often read aloud, listening to themselves as they go. They have found that this allows them to understand what they are reading and remember it afterward.

Can your child tell you about the things they have seen or heard.

♦ Auditory learners are great story tellers. They enjoy contributing to discussions and explaining ideas.

Does your child enjoy listening to a lecture more than they enjoy reading a good book?

♦ A verbal recounting of lectures usually comes easy to the child who is an auditory learner. But when they have to brush up later for a test, they may have a hard time studying from the textbook. Ask the instructor if the child can record lectures to use at a later date.

Once the learning techniques of the auditory learner have been identified, speak with the teacher and request that every opportunity is given the child to do well in school. Recognize that the auditory learner is often a social butterfly, and ask that the child be called upon often in class to answer questions to keep them focused on the subject being taught.

Understand that the auditory learner will do better on oral tests than on written exams, and ask if the teacher can vary the types of tests that she gives the class.

When the child is studying written materials or doing homework, play background music. Some schools have started allowing pre-approved music in the classroom to help the children study.

Auditory learners do well in work and study groups. If your child has trouble focusing in homework, encourage him to invite a friend from class over after school to study.

There are three different learning styles, and schools must teach all children, not just the auditory learner. Understand that more time cannot be given to the auditory learner than the visual or kinesthetic learner. By working together as a team, the student, school and involved parent can make sure that each child is given tools to meet the challenge of learning, no matter what learning style they have.

About Patrice

Patrice Campbell is a freelance writer working from the Denver area. Campbell started her writing career in the 1980’s, working for several Wisconsin local papers as a news, human interest and features writer, as well as a photographer.


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{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Ann May 25, 2011 at 4:54 pm

That was super information. I have been having a hard time with my son as his verbal/oral skills are graded at a very high level in school (he is just finishing 3rd grade) and does poorly on his writing skills. This explains a lot and I will be better able to help him now that I have a better understanding of him. Thank you!

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